hormonal balance

HOW HORMONES CONTROL OUR LIVES PT.1

There’s not enough emphasis on the role and impact of hormones, in particular sex hormones, in the human body.

We are pretty much “slaves” to our sex hormones.

This is the part one of my articles on human sex hormones, as the subject is so vast that it wouldn’t fit into one short article.

THE MAIN DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MAN AND WOMAN ARE CAUSED BY SEX HORMONES

The main differences between man and woman are already decided during the first weeks of pregnancy, where male and female fetuses receive different types of hormones in different amounts.

The types and amounts of hormones will determine the way their brains develop and the interests they will have later in life.

For example male fetuses are given high levels of testosterone during pregnancy which will make them more competitive, more aggressive, more interested in the way the world and things work and less interested in people, feelings, emotions and will have less empathy.

Female fetuses are given high levels of estrogen and a little bit of testosterone.

Making women more interested in feelings, people, emotions, relationships, more empathic and less interested in things and dominance.

THE TRICKY PART HAPPENS WHEN FOR WHATEVER REASON, USUALLY STRESS, MALE AND FEMALE FETUSES RECEIVE TOO MUCH OF THE WRONG HORMONES

I have had countless women tell me that they feel more masculine and identify more with men. While many men have told me that they feel more feminine and care more about emotions and feelings than about “manly” things and manly professions.

When a woman is pregnant it is a really delicate state, where she should be as stress free as possible and as healthy and calm as possible.

Sadly in our stressful modern world this almost never happens.

The result is that today’s women are more masculine while today’s men are more feminine.

WHEN A PREGNANT WOMAN IS STRESSED, HER BODY WILL AUTOMATICALLY DOSE MORE TESTOSTERONE TO THE FETUS CAUSING UNUSUAL BRAIN DEVELOPMENT IN THE FETUS.

When a female fetus is given too much testosterone, she will develop more the areas of the brain that are masculine, making her more similar to man in behavior and overall interests.

She may also be taller and less fertile, have more body hair, be more competitive, more aggressive, and be less interested in feelings and emotions, and have less empathy.

She might also excel in professions that are more masculine and competitive.

Female fetuses that during pregnancy are exposed to higher levels of testosterone than usual, will probably have right brain dominance. This can cause left-handedness or hidden left-handedness, dyslexia, weaker immune systems and be more prone to have autoimmune diseases. 

WHEN A MALE FETUS RECEIVES TOO MUCH TESTOSTERONE IT WILL MAKE HIM EITHER MORE FEMININE OR SO MASCULINE THAT IT DEVELOPS MENTAL DISORDERS

All fetuses start out as female (even if the chromosomes are XY). After the sixth week of pregnancy the fetus will start receiving the first doses of hormones.

Male fetuses are ironically really sensitive and delicate to testosterone levels. Too much or too little testosterone will make the male fetus too feminine or cause him to have unusual brain developments. From mild ones like left-handedness, dyslexia, speech problems, to more severe ones like autism.

Just like in the female fetus, male fetuses that are exposed to higher levels of testosterone than usual, might develop right brain dominance. Which can cause left-handedness or hidden left-handedness, dyslexia, weaker immune systems and be more prone to have autoimmune diseases. 

If the levels of testosterone a male fetus receives are very unusually high, they might also be born with asperger’s syndrome or even autism.

Only the right amount of testosterone will make the fetus a heterosexual and hormonally well balanced male human.

In conclusion it is really important for a woman to be well prepared for pregnancy and have as little stress as possible. Along with following a really healthy diet rich in vitamins and minerals.

Source: Szendi Gàbor, A No Felemelkedèse ès tundoklèse (2008).

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